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Central Colchester Communities

In this section, various historic events were gathered on the communities of South Colchester by the Nova Scotia Archives and Records Managment and related here, accordingly. Please select from the following list to read the Community of your choice.

Beaver Brook

Belmont

Black Rock

Brookside

Camden

Clifton

Cottam Settlement

Crowes Mills

Debert

Delaney Settlement

East Folly Mountain

East Mines

East Mountain

Fort Belcher

Green Creek

Greenfield

Green Oaks

Harmony

Hilden

Kemptown

Kings Rest

Lower Truro

Manganese Mines

Masstown

McBains Corner

McCallum Settlement

McClures Mills

McCurdy

Murray

North River

Old Barns

Onslow

Princeport

Riversdale

Salmon River

Staples Brook

Truro Heights

Union

Valley Station

Beaver Brook
This rural area is located on the Beaver Brook, about three miles east of the Shubenacadie River mouth, in central Nova Scotia.  It was so named because early settlers found beaver dams along the brook.  The original proprietors of this part of Truro township were James Yuill and his son, James, who settled at Old Barns.  James Rutherford purchased one of these lots sometime in the 1770’s and settled down to clear a farm.  About 1786, Thomas Crowe moved from Windsor, purchased a farm from Mr. Rutherford and commenced to settle.  Other of the Yuill lots were sold to James Davidson and John Oughterson by 1776. Population in 1956 was 121.  

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Belmont
This settlement is located about five miles up the Chiganois river, north of Cobequid Bay, in central Nova Scotia.  The name means “beautiful mountain” and is quite common, being the name given to at least twenty-five places in the United States.  Possibly the Irish settlers of Londonderry township named this place after Belmont, New Hampshire, their native state because soon after 1872, the name was changed from Chiganois to Belmont. 
The First Nations People called the river Nesakunechkik, “eel weirs”.  When the French Acadians built a village here in the early 18th century, they called it Vil Nigeganish, a variation of the  original name, and from this came the English variations Isgonish and Chiganois. 
Vil Nigeganish was settled by the Acadians soon after 1700, and by August, 1755 it included about ten buildings with several fine farms.  In September 1755, Captain Lewis and his men burnt several of the Cobequid villages which had already been deserted by the French who fled to avoid deportation.  About 1762, Robert Barnhill from Donegal, North Ireland settled here.  Soon afterward, Thomas Baird, Alexander Deyarmond, Joseph Crowe, Sr., and John Barnhill, township grantees who drew their lots in this area, arrived to begin settlement. 
On August 19, 1905, a fire destroyed the hotel, the Baptist Church, a railway station, two stores, four homes, a blacksmith shop, three barns, and several small buildings.  The church was rebuilt in 1908, and a new railway station was opened in 1906. Population in 1956 for Belmont was 438 with Upper Belmont at 95. 

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Black Rock
This rural area is located on the west side of the mouth of the Shubenacadie River.  It was named for a prominent natural roak feature.  Samuel Creelman reputedly was the first settler in 1772, when he purchased 500 acres laid off for David Archibald.  The ruins of a French Acadian village, destroyed by British troops in 1755, were visible at the cove in 1767. 
The Forbes farm, which was built before 1811, was also called Black Rock.  Samuel Smith was the schoolmaster in 1838.  A Ferry service across the Shubenacadie River was operated by Robert and William Forbes prior to 1811.  In January, 1819, the Colchester County of Quarter Sessions established regulations for a ferry across the river to be operated by Samuel Forbes, or anyone else who would take it.  The Nelson family eventually took over the ferry and operated it for about a century until it was discontinued in 1934.   

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Brookside
This settlement is located between the Salmon and North Rivers, north-east of Truro in central Nova Scotia.  The western section of East Mountain became subdivided into the local place names of Brookside and Upper Brooksdie, or “Jollytown” as it was called by James Little when he, Samuel McNutt, James Wright, Fred Shultz, and Ebenezer Harris were the only residents.  Eventually, David Little built a house beside Farnhams Pond near Bible Hill and called it Brookside.  The name first included the settlement around the Mill Brook.  Later a Post Office was established a mile up the brook and named Upper Brookside. “Upper” was eventually dropped except for Jollytown section which evidently then became “Upper Brookside”.  Settlement probably began in the late 18th century. Population in 1956 was 332. 

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Camden
This settlement is located about five miles south-east of Truro on the old road to Stewiacke in central Nova Scotia.  It may have been named in honour of Charles Pratt, Earl of Camden and Viscount Bayham, Chief Justice of the Common Pleas and Lord Chancellor of England, who died in 1794.  The name may also date the settlement, which was probably begun by descendants of the Truro township proprietors.

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Clifton
This rural area is located near the mouth of Beaver Brook at the head of Cobequid Bay, in central Nova Scotia.  Irving donated a lot for the schoolhouse on the condition that the section be named Clifton for his old Scottish home.  Before this it was evidently part of Old Barns.  In 1882, a movement to replace the name “Old Barns” with “Clifton” was blocked by Lieutenant-Governor Archibald.  Consequently the west half of the community became Old Barns.  Settlement was begun here by the Acadians soon after 1700.  They were driven out and their homes were destroyed in September of 1755. Around 1761, English settlement began in the area.  

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Cottam Settlement
This settlement is located near the head of Debert River in central Nova Scotia.  It was named after early settlers, the Cottams.  Six Cottam families lived here about 1875, including Captain W. C. Cottam, H. Cottam and J. P. Cottam.  They were Londonderry farmers who petitioned for grants of land in July 1820.  “When young were taken to a very obsure part of this township with their father, with whom they have resided and made very extensive improvements for him”.  They may have been the founders of this settlement. 
James Cottam, a native of England and a veteran of the American Revolutionary War, was discharged at Halifax and settled in the back part of Londonderry.  In 1820 he applied for land and obtained a survey for 300 acres on which he began to make improvements.  This lot was left to Robert Cottam.  

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Crowes Mills
This rural area is located about three miles north of the mouth of the Salmon River and two miles east of the Chiganois River.  The place takes its name from the mills which were established here by James Crowe about 1785, and which were still in operation in 1960.  William Gourly was the schoolmaster of Mill District, which was “to include the settlers at Crows Mill,” in 1828. Population in 1956 was 132.   

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Debert
This settlement is located about six miles up the Debert River, north of Cobequid Bay.  The First Nation's name for Debert River was Wasokgek, “it is bright” or “glistening and bright”.  The first settler to locate in the area was a French settler by the name of DÙBurt, hence the early references to the names of Village Deburk or DeBourg.  He built his home near the mouth of the Debert River.  The first English-speaking settler of Debert did not arrive until 38 years after the Explusion.  The name “Debert River” appears on the maps between 1820 and 1829 and Haliburton refers to “Deburt” as being one of the seven small settlements in Londonderry in 1828.   James Cottam came to the Debert area after the War of 1812 and was given a grant of land in Debert Mountain.  He built and owned the first flour mill and wood-working plant in Debert. 
The first minister of the area was Reverend James Brown, a Presbyterian who came to Nova Scotia from Scotland.  He conducted his faithful ministry for 53 years and died in 1848 at the age of 82 (Carter, 1958).  In the 1870’s, the Debert village was located at the mouth of the river, and the present Debert was called McCullochs Corner, after James McCulloch who had a store there. 
After the Federal Government expropriated the land in 1940 and built Camp Debert, a military training centre, the population shifted to "Debert River", in the vicinity of the camp and the railway, and that village came to be called Debert.  A Postal Way Office was established at River Debert in 1855.  Debert is the site of the oldest archeological site in Nova Scotia, the Palaeo-Indian site.  Artifacts dating from 10 000 to 13 000 years old have beeen found here.  The new Federal Post Office was completed June 6, 1964.  Population in 1956 was: Debert 808, Lower Debert 69. 

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Delaney Settlement
This settlement is located about three miles west of the West Branch of the North River in central Nova Scotia.  It was named after the Delaney family who were early residents, prior to 1875. 

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East Folly Mountain
This rural area is located about two miles east of the Folly River and about eight miles north of Cobequid Bay, in central Nova Scotia.  The high hills on the east side of the Folly River came to be called the East Folly Mountain, and from this the settlement got its name.  It was probably settled early in the 19th century by descendents of the Londonderry Township proprietors. A Post Office was established at East Folly Mountain on December 1, 1876 with Mrs. B. Gunn as postmistress. 

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East Mines
This is a small rural area located on the east side of the Folly River, about eight miles from the mouth of the river, in central Nova Scotia.  This was the location of the east mines of the Acadia Charcoal Iron Company, and from this, the place came to be named.  Settlement was probably begun by descendants of the Londonderry township proprietors in the early 19th century.  A new school was built in 1932 to replace a building destroyed by fire.  Farming and lumbering were the basic industries.  Population in 1956 was 80.  

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East Mountain
This settlement is located about a mile south of the South Branch of the North River in central Nova Scotia.  It was probably so named from its position on a “Mountain” east of Truro.  The land was part of Onslow Township, but the early settlers probably came from Truro in the late 18th century. A Postal Way Office was established at Onslow East Mountain in 1864. Population in 1956 was 116. 

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Fort Belcher
This settlement is located at Lyons Head, on the north side of the mouth of the Salmon River in central Nova Scotia.  Fort Belcher, from which the place name originated, was built about 1761 “to awe to curb the Mickmack Indians” and was named after Lieutenant-Governor Jonathan Belcher.  It was “abandoned and going fast to ruin” in 1767. 
Jacob Lynds came from New England in 1761, later settled here, and died on November 22, 1768.  He sold his farm to Richard Upham who was living here in 1767.  The French Acadians occupied the area early in the 18th century, so that by 1748 there were fifteen families residing there.  They departed in September 1755, and the New Englanders came in 1761. 

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Green Creek
This settlement is located on Greens Creek about eight miles south of the mouth of the Shubenacadie River.  It was probably named for the Green family who were early residents.  The land was part of Truro township and was probably settled by 1780.  John McDougall and Henry Brown were the teachers at Greens Creek in 1841.  A Postal Way Office was established on August 1, 1870 with Daniel Dort as office keeper.

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Greenfield
This is a small rural area situated about two miles south of the Salmon River and about six miles east of Truro.  The name is descriptive and was given by Surveyor Alexander Miller around 1817.  In 1814, land was granted to James Braynion of Truro who came to Nova Scotia from Scotland in 1797; Samuel Whidden, Jr., a native of Truro born in 1789; John Reed, a native of Londonderry township, born in 1789; Samuel Whidden, Sr; and Eddy Whidden, who repeatedly is referenced as beng the first settler around 1815.  John Dickson, who came from Scotland about 1774 and his son Thomas, residents of Onslow Mountain in 1814, received grants of land here in 1815. Farming and some lumbering were carried on as industries.  Population in 1956 was 76. 

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Green Oaks
This rural area is located about 6 miles from the mouth of the Shubenacadie River.  Possibly it was so named because of the Green family who lived here and because of the number of oak trees in the area.  An early name was “Phillips Settlement”.  The land was part of Truro township and was probably settled by 1780. The Midland Railyway Bridge across the Shubenacadie River was completed in 1899. Population in 1956 was 100. 

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Harmony
This rural area is located about four miles south-east of Truro.  The name, when given, was probably intended to be descriptive and dates back at least to 1840.  James Smith was one of the early settlers shortly after 1821. Population in 1956 was 123. 

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Hilden
This settlement is located about four miles south of Truro.  At the time that the Intercolonial Railway began operation in December 1858, the settlement was called “Halifax Road”.  A railway station was built and about that time a meeting was called to name the place.  “Clarksville” was suggested in honor of an old family.  The majority decided on “Johnstons Crossing” in honour of a man who had his farm on the baseline road which crossed the Halifax road at the railway. 
In the 1870’s, “Clarksville” was used in reference to the western part of the settlement and “Johnstons Crossing” referred to the eastern half.  By act of the Provincial Legislature in 1895, the name of the settlement known as “Slabtown”, “Clarksville” and “Johnstons Crossing” was changed to Hilden, possibly after Hilden, near Belfast Ireland. Population in 1956 was 523. 

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Kemptown
This settlement is located on the headwaters of the Salmon River about four miles west of the Pictou-Colchester county line.  It was so named by Surveyor Alexander Miller in honour of Sir James Kempt, who came to Halifax as Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia in 1820. 
David Archibald, the 2nd, was evidently one of the first settlers at Kemptown, having built mills here prior to 1790.  In 1810 a large tract of land was laid out for him, adjoining land he already owned by purchase.  Further grants were made to David Archibald and John Hingley in 1815.  At Upper Kemptown, grants were made to: James Talbot and John Christie in 1816; Alexander Urquhart in 1829; Malcolm Selllers in 1831; George Bannerman in 1837; and Donald and Andrew Munro in 1839.  Andrew Munro, a native of Ross-shire Scotland, came to Nova Scotia in May 1831 and settled at Earltown.  Alexander Urquhart settled here about 1820 and suffered a real or supposed infringement on his property when another group of settlers arrived from the old country about 1832.  A Postal Way Office was in operation between 1854 and 1859.  In 1860, another office was established. Population in 1956 was 217.    

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Kings Rest
This village is located on the east side of the mouth of the Bass River on the north side of Cobequid Bay.  About 1875 the place was called “Birch Hill”.  Later the named “Kings Rest” was given, partly in imitation of “Saints Rest” across the river, and partly because of the cemetery there. The area was settled in the late 18th century by the Fulton family, Judge James Fulton, a pioneer, who died in 1826. John McLean, a schoolmaster brought from Scotland by the Judge, died in 1790 and was buried here.  James Miller was the schoolmaster at Birch Hill in 1846.  Farming and fishing were the main occupations.  Population of Birch Hill in 1956 was 75.  

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Lower Truro
This settlement is located on the south side of the mouth of the Salmon River.  Shortly after 1700, the Acadian French established a settlement at Cobequid.  Three of the settlers, Jean, Pierre, and Abraham Bourg, who were listed in the 1714 census as being at Cobequid, may have begun the village which was known in 1756 as Vil La Bourg.
On August 19, 1755, the French villages along the south side of the bay were destroyed by British troops under the command of Captain Abijah Willard, but the inhabitants had already departed and escaped deportation.  Towards the last of May 1761, several shiploads of Scots-Irish people arrived to settle the new township of Truro.  The new settlement was nominally divided into the upper or Derry Village, on land which the Acadians had scarcely improved, and the lower, or Down Village, situated on the site of the French village on the interval.  Derry Village became the Town of Truro, and Down Village became Lower Truro.  "Lower" refers to the fact that this village is nearer the mouth of the river than is Truro. Population in 1956 was 335.  

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Manganese Mines
This rural area is located between the Salmon River and South Branch North River about six miles north-east of Truro.  The name was given when manganese was discovered and mined here.  The land was part of Onslow Township and was probably settled soon after 1761 by Truro and Onslow township proprietors who had emigrated from New Hampshire and Massachusetts.  A few barrels of manganese were mined here in1880.  In 1881, Mr. McLellan and Mr. Archibald were prospecting and obtained about fifteen tons of ore, but regular work had not been started.  In 1891, a few tons of ore were shipped from the mine, but operations evidently ceased soon afterward.  Farming is now the main industry.  Population in 1956 was 57. 

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Masstown
This settlement is located about half-way between the Debert and Chiganois rivers, on the north side of Cobequid Bay.  It was so named by the early settlers because it was the site of one of the principal French mass-houses in the Cobequid areaSettlement probably began here soon after 1700, and by 1755 this was the “chief place in Cobequid” containing the parish church of St. Peter and St. Paul built by Abbe Le Loutre shortly after 1738.  The French name for the place was Le Paroisse – the Parish.  “Cove d’Eglise” was also used in reference to this place.  In 1755, the French abandoned the village and fled to avoid deportation by English forces. 
On September 23 to 25, 1755, Captain Lewis and his men burned the deserted villages of Cobequid.  The land was vacant until about 1761 when Irish people from New England, brought here by Alexander McNutt, took up the vacant land and recommenced settlement.  They called it Mass Village and began to carry on a linen manufactory by 1767.  A Postal Way Office was established in 1859. Population in 1956 was 196.

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McBains Corner 
This community is situated about a mile west of the Colchester-Pictou county line, about seven miles south of John Bay.  It was so named for McBains who lived here.  In June 1819, it was reported that a new settlement had begun between the Tatamagouche River and the River John, called “New Portigal” consisting of about twelve settlers with about forty more taking up land in the vicinity on which to settle.  Daniel Ross of that settlement was appointed surveyor of roads.  Land in the vicinity of McBains Corner was granted to: Frederick and John Jeanperin, Alexander Langille, and George Jowdrie in 1815: and Henry Hatton and Kenneth Cameron in 1816.  A schoolhouse was built here before 1875.  Farming and lumbering are the basic industries. 

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McCallum Settlement
This settlement is located on the West Branch of North River in central  Nova Scotia.  It was named after early settlers who probably moved into the area in the early 19th century.  The land was a part of Onslow township.  

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McClures Mills
This community is situated on the west side of McClures Brook within the boundaries of the Town of Truro.  It was named for J. McClure who owned an oat mill and a kiln here in the late 19th century.  The settlement was an offshoot of Truro.  Alexander Bonyman was the Postmaster at “McClure” in 1914. 

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McCurdy
This place is designated as a locality and is about three miles north-west of Truro, in central Nova Scotia.  It was probably named after an early resident.  The land was part of Onslow township, and because of its closeness to the main centers in the township, settlement probably began soon after 1761.  There was a carriage factory in operation near here in the 1870’s.  

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Murray
This rural area is located on the Salmon River, east of Truro.  It may have been named after John Murray for whom 500 acres of land were surveyed in November of 1820.  He had made a clearing on the land by February, 1846.  Murray Siding was so named when the Pictou Branch Railway was built about 1866.  Farming, particularly sheep raising, was the main industry.  Population in 1956 was: Murray, 153 and Murray Siding, 58. 

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North River
The three communities that share this place-name are located in the vicinity of the forks of the North River in central Nova Scotia.   This river, which gave the community its name, was probably so called by the early settlers of Truro because its flow was almost directly from north to south and also because the river was north of the town. A few Acadians settled along the North River by 1748.  The Dugas family lived here and on old maps the river is called River Dugato.  The interval land along the river undoubtedly attracted some of the proprietors of Truro and Onslow townships soon after they arrived in 1761, of which Captain William Blair was one.  A Postal Way Office was established in 1866.  In February 1892, a new Post Office was opened with Robert Stewart as Postmaster.  Population in 1956 was: North River, 289, Central North River, 59 and Upper North River, 81. 

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Old Barns
This rural area is located at the head of Cobequid Bay, opposite Lyons Head, in central Nova Scotia.  On the arrival of the British settlers, they found only two French barns remaining, hence the lower division of the (Truro) township was denominated, Barn Village.  These old barns were torn down in the late 1820’s.  The name “Old Barns” was being used as early as February 1784. 
On a 1756 map, Vil Le Bourge is on the site of the present Lower Truro station and another Acadian village is on the site of the present Old Barns.  Jean, Pierre, and Abraham Bourg are listed in the 1714 census for Cobequid, hence settlement had begun here by 1714.  In September 1755, the villages of the Acadians, who had fled to avoid deportation, were burned. 
James Yuill of Clyesdale, Scotland moved here from Boston in 1761 and became one of the first settlers under British patronage.  DesBarres’ 1780 map shows the location of Truro at or near the present location of Old Barns. The Midland Railway was begun at Windsor in May 1898, completed in 1901, and was sold to the D.A.R. on February 7, 1905.  Population in 1956 was 141. 

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Onslow
The four communities that share this place name of located north of the mouth of the Salmon River and in the area of the Junction of the Salmon and North Rivers in central Nova Scotia.  Onslow township, from which these communities take their name, was named after Arthur Onslow, an English statesman who was Speaker of the House of Commons from 1727 to 1754. 
The Acadian French probably began to inhabit the area about 1700.  Michael and Alexis Au Coin and Joseph Dugas were included in the 1714 census for Cobequid.  These French villages, however, were destroyed by British troops under the command of Capt. Lewis in September 1755 . In 1759 Onslow township was formed with fifty-three shares, and towards the last of May 1761, thirty families of Scots-Irish arrived from Massachusetts to recommence the settlement of the land. 
By 1828 the front of the township was nominally divided into three villages.  One of these was “Kings Village”, so named before 1771.  By 1875 this was called “Queens Village”.  Eventually this place came to be called Lower Onslow, the name established for the school section.  On May 3, 1771, Richard Upham, a proprietor, sold a tract of improved land east of the barracks (Fort Belcher) in Kings Village to William Putnam.  Ephraim Howard settled near the North River bridge sometime after 1763 and built one of the first mills on Onslow.  John Blair settled on Onslow Mountain soon after 1807.  John Dickson, who came from Scotland about 1774, and his sons, Thomas and William, lived at Onslow Mountain in 1813. 
The Onslow Meetinghouse was framed about 1768 or 1769.  Postal Way Offices were established at Upper Onslow in 1854, at Onslow in 1855, and at North River Bridge, Colchester County in 1858.  Population in 1956 was: Central Onslow 247; Lower Onslow 213; Onslow Mountain 214; Upper Onslow 417. 

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Princeport
This rural area is located about four miles upstream, on the east bank of the Shubenacadie River.  It seems to have taken its name from the visit of the Prince of Wales, later King Edward VII, to Truro in 1860.  William Nesbit was the township proprietor who drew his 500 acre lot in this area.  Matthew Creelman was one of the first settlers, soon after 1791 on part of this lot, which had been purchased by his father, Samuel.  A Postal Way Office was established on July 1, 1866 with S. Creelman as office keeper.  Population in 1956 was 81. 

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Riversdale
This community is located on the Black River in central Nova Scotia.  Its name was prompted by the prominent natural features.  In 1850 the place was considered to be part of Greenfield.  In January 1867, the name of the place was changed from Georgetown to Riversdale.  The earliest grants were composed of four adjacent lots given in 1813 to Donald and Alexander McKenzie, and Kenneth and Murdock Munro.  The Murdock Innes grant was made in 1817, and the village site was granted to George Duncan in 1850.  A Postal Way Office was established in 1867.  The Pictou Branch Railway was completed between Truro and Riversdale by December 31, 1866.  A station was erected by July, 1867.  Population in 1956 was 53. 

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Salmon River
This community is located in the Salmon River Valley, east of Truro, and derives its name from its location.  The name may have been a literal tranaslation of the First Nation's word, Pulamooa seboo, “salmon river”.  Settlement probably began soon after 1761 when Charles Cox settled on his interval lot on the south side of the river.  Adam Dickie and John Caldwell were his neighbours.  Samuel Whidden settled on the Salmon River Interval soon after 1774.  Coal was mined here about 1838 by John Archibald.  In 1858, the seam was reopened.  In 1866 the Pictou Branch Railway was completed through here.  The Producers Milk Products Ltd. Cheese Plant was opened November 9, 1966.  Farming was the basic industry.  Population in 1956 was 952. 

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Staples Brook
This community is located north of Belmont on the Chiganois River.  It was probably named after the Staples family who were early settlers.  In March 1820, John Staples, an Onslow farmer petitioned for land “in the rear of Londonderry”.  Reputedly it was he who began the settlement at what became Staples Brook.  Hugh McCully was the postmaster here in 1914.  Population in 1956 was 78. 

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Truro Heights
This rural area is located about two miles south-west of Truro.  It was probably an outgrowth of the village of Truro in the late 18th or early 19th century, and was called Weatherbie Settlement up until about 1935 when the name “Truro Heights” came into use.  This name was probably given because of the hills in which the community grew.  Population in 1956 was 243.

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Union
This community is located on the Salmon River, north-east of Truro.  The name is quite common in railroad terminology and probably owes its origin to a railroad official.  The railway was completed between Truro and Riversdale by December 31, 1886, and Union Station was the first station east of Truro for 8 ½ miles.  In December 1867 the place was described as a new settlement on the Pictou Railway without schoolhouse or meetinghouse, although the former was in contemplation.  The village site was part of a grant made to Joseph Marchington, James Fraser, and Alexander Anderson in 1811 which included 1400 acres on both sides of the river.   

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Valley Station
This community is located about four miles east of Truro on the Salmon River.  In 1872 the post office carried the name Teviotdale Station, after the home of George N. Christie, the postmaster, in Roxburghshire, Scotland.  Not long after this, however, the name “Valley Station” was given by Alexander Cameron.  The building of an Intercolonial Railway Station at this spot in the Salmon River Valley prompted the name. 

Murray Taylor Jr., was one of the first settlers about 1783.  He built a sawmill along Half Moon Brook on land bought from Thomas Archibald.  The Teviotdale Station Way Office was established January 1, 1872 with George N. Christie as Postmaster.  The railway was completed enough for use by August, 1866.  A station was built a few years later.  It was destroyed by fire in autumn of 1917 and replaced the following year.  A Temperance Hall was built in 1910.  A wooden bridge over the river was washed out in October 1923, and a new bridge was completed in 1924.  Lumbering and agriculture were, and are the leading industries.  A lumber mill also is located here.  Population in 1956 was 263.

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