Mi'kmawey Debert Interpretive Trail

Mi'kmawey Debert Trail

The Mi'kmawey Debert Interpretive Trail is a woodland trail with several stream crossings. Interpretive panels, with beautiful artwork by Dozay Christmas of Membertou Mi’kmaw Community, tell the story of the First People in Nova Scotia and their life in Debert.

Archaeological research has revealed that the Mi'kmawey site in Debert was a traditional hunting place of the First People (Paleo-Indian people) who lived in Atlantic Canada almost 11,000 years ago. This is an historic and significant site. The Mi'kmawey Debert site is designated under the Nova Scotia Special Places Protection Act and recognized as a National Historic Site.

The Mi’kmawey Debert Interpretive Trail celebrated its 10th Anniversary in 2013.

pdf Mikmawey Debert Interpretive Trail information page with map (387 kB) (387 KB)

For your safety, please stay on the trail.

Caution! - Be advised that there is a chance of encountering unexploded explosive ordnance (UXO) in this area. UXO is the term for military explosives that were used but failed to function properly or to detonate. If UXO is disturbed, it could function or explode and cause serious injury or death. If you see something that could be UXO, do not touch it! Leave the area and call 911. For more information:  pdf UXO Factsheet - Debert (284 kB) (284 KB)

Type:   Loop
Length:   4.4 km
Surface:   Dirt path, wood chips, wooden steps, boardwalk
Rating:   Moderate
Marking:   Follow obvious path and directional signs
Permitted Use:   Walking
Access:   Highway 104, Exit 13 and go north onto MacElmons Road, then veer left onto Plains Road. The trailhead is at 1952 Plains Road, on the left, 2 km from exit 13.

Information:

 

This trail is managed and maintained by the Confederacy of Mainland Mi'kmaq, 902-895-6385. Click here for more information.

Mi'kmawey Debert Trail